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CEREO Class

Biol 540- Stable Isotope Theory and Methods

Lecture: Tu, Th 9:10 – 10:25 Lab: TU 1:25 – 4:15
Students will learn to design, interpret, and critically evaluate the use of stable isotopic tools. Specifically, we will focus on efficiently learning terminology and notation, sources of variation,
mathematical models of isotope composition, and key applications of stable isotope techniques. The laboratory section of the course will provide handson experience with stable isotope mass spectrometers WSU Stable Isotope Core Facility to train you to run your own samples.
For information contact Dr. R. Dave Evans (5-7466; rdevans@wsu.edu)

506 Theory and Measurement of Turbulent Fluxes

Class hours: MON/WED 3:10-2:25pm meetings: Sloan 32 Instructor: Heping Liu
This course seeks to train graduate students in the theory and measurements of heat, water vapor, and carbon dioxide fluxes between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. Students will be introduced to the micrometeorological theory of atmospheric turbulence and land-surface fluxes and the working principles of state-of-the-art eddy covariance systems and sensors for flux measurements. Through detailed, hands-on practice, students will learn how to design and build a micrometeorological flux tower and gain skills in datalogger programming, sensor wiring, data acquisition, and post-field processing and statistical analysis of eddy covariance flux data. Quality assurance and quality controls of flux data will also be discussed. Special topics will be covered, including the surface energy balance over different ecosystems, terrestrial ecosystem carbon budgets, uncertainties in flux measurements, and fluxes over complex terrain. Students will learn how to utilize flux data from the FLUXNET or Ameriflux networks to study the surface energy budget, evaporation, and/or carbon budget over a variety of terrestrial ecosystems across different time scales.

CE 543-Climate Change: from basic principles to modeling

Instructor: Yunha Lee Office: PACCAR 452 email: Yunha.lee@wsu.edu
The goal of this class is to gain qualitative understanding of Earth’s climate change and numerical climate modeling. It will cover the aspect of major components of the Earth’s climate system, key physical processes affecting Earth’s energy balance, and how these are represented in current climate models. We will also explore how climate models are used for climate impacts assessments and mitigation policies. This course is designed for a graduate or an advanced undergraduate student who wants to learn the scientific fundamentals of climate change and climate modeling.

CE506: Theory and Measurements of Fluxes (3 credits in the 2017 fall semester)

Instructors:Dr. Heping Liu, Associate Professor in Laboratory for Atmospheric Research, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Pullman, WSU

Contact: Heping.Liu@wsu.edu; Tel.: 509-335-1529; http://micromet.paccar.wsu.edu/

Course Overview: This course seeks to train graduate students in the theory and measurements of heat, water vapor, and carbon dioxide fluxes between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. Students will be introduced to the micrometeorological theory of atmospheric turbulence and land-surface fluxes and the working principles of state-of-the-art eddy covariance systems and sensors for flux measurements. Through detailed, hands-on practice, students will learn how to design and build a micrometeorological flux tower and gain skills in datalogger programming, sensor wiring, data acquisition, and post-field processing and statistical analysis of eddy covariance data to calculate fluxes. Quality assurance and quality controls of flux data will also be discussed. Special topics will be covered, including the surface energy balance over different ecosystems, terrestrial ecosystem carbon budgets, uncertainties in flux measurements, and fluxes over complex terrain. Students will complete a course project utilizing flux data from the FLUXNET or Ameriflux networks to study the surface energy budget, evaporation, and/or carbon budget over a variety of terrestrial ecosystems across different time scales.

Software Carpentry Workshop

Software Carpentry is a hands-on workshop being hosted by the Center for Environmental Research, Education and Outreach (CEREO), Center for Institutional Research Computing (CIRC), and Laboratory for Atmospheric Research (LAR). The two-day workshop will be held from August 16-17 and focuses on skills for computationally-intensive research.  Live exercises and tutorials will introduce a variety of topics including programming in Python, version control with Git, and task automation with the unix shell. No prior programming experience is needed! This workshop is ideal for incoming graduate students, or any researcher looking for more experience with Python.

Visit the workshop website here for additional information and registration details. Cost is $25, payable by credit card or WSU IRI. Flyer

 

Stable Isotope Theory and Methods, (Biol 540), Fall 2017

Lecture: Tu, Th 9:10 – 10:25

Lab: TU 1:25 – 4:15

Students will learn to design, interpret, and critically evaluate the use of stable isotopic tools. Specifically, we will focus on efficiently learning terminology and notation, sources of variation, mathematical models of isotope composition, and key applications of stable isotope techniques. The laboratory section of the course will provide hands on experience with stable isotope mass spectrometers WSU Stable Isotope Core Facility to train you to run your own samples.

For information contact Dr. R. Dave Evans (5-7466; rdevans@wsu.edu)

2017 EcoFS Summer Course Flyer

Caribbean Ecosystem Field Studies
* Study, snorkel & SCUBA dive on the Caribbean coral reef of Mexico *
    May 21- June 10  or  June 14 – July 4
Colorado Ecosystem Field Studies  
* Study, camp, & hike in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado *
   June 18 – July 8  or  July 15- August 4
For all course information visit the website: EcoFS.org

 

 

ORAP GRANT PROPOSAL ASSISTANCE: CAREER (NSF 17-537)

This proposal development course will begin on Wednesday, February 15 from 11:30 till 1:30 in Lighty 280 and will continue every Wednesday thereafter for ~8-10 weeks (or as needed). If this does not work for you, please contact Emily Brashear at the email address below and we will discuss options.

Emily.brashear@wsu.edu.

For more information and to submit

 

The Art of Science Communication

An online training course available to ALL scientists and STEM professionals. This course will provide participants with fundamental training in science communication, focusing on how to present science to a non-expert audience in a formal setting. The course covers the important components of what makes for a successful presentation and participants will be able to utilize the skills learned during the course in their professional lives.

Winter Session Course: February 6th – March 27th

Cost: $25 for ASBMB members, $100 for non-members

For more information visit