Skip to main content Skip to navigation
CEREO Class

Stable Isotope Theory and Methods (Biol 540) Spring 2021

Tu, Th 10:35 – 11:50

Course Description: Students will learn to design, interpret, and critically evaluate the use of stable isotopic tools. Specifically, we will focus on terminology and notation, sources of variation, models of isotope composition, and key applications of stable isotope techniques. Topics address the isotopic composition of plants, animals, soils, water, food webs, advanced techniques, plus any topics of interest to students.

The course is offered online this year without the lab section. We will accommodate students enrolled this spring in future lab instruction.

For information contact Dr. R. Dave Evans (5-7466; rdevans@wsu.edu)

 

SOE 592 Aquatic Microbial Ecology Spring 2020

Tuesdays & Thursdays 1:25-2:40pm

Hosted in Vancouver with AMS/zoom to all campuses

Instructor: Dr. Gretchen Rollwagen-Bollens

This graduate course is focused on the biology and ecology of aquatic microbes, including protists (“plant-like” algae and “animal-like” protozoans), bacterial communities and viruses in aquatic systems. The course will consist of instructor-led presentations/lectures and student-led discussions of primary research literature, with consultation and support from the instructor. Each student will be expected to lead at least two discussions (with a student partner), to prepare two short literature reviews, and write an 8-10 page review paper.

Discussion topics may include:

  • Aquatic protist evolution and paleoecology
  • A review of microbial biodiversity and function
  • Ecological physiology of planktonic microbes
  • Worldwide abundance and distribution of aquatic microbes
  • Challenges in sampling and identifying aquatic microbes
  • Role of microbes in aquatic food webs
  • Protist symbioses
  • Protists, marine snow and carbon flux
  • Role of viruses in aquatic systems

The seminar is open to advanced undergraduates who have taken BIO 106, BIO 372 and have approval of the instructor.

SOE 592 Aquatic Microbial Ecology Spring 2020

Tuesdays & Thursdays 1:25-2:40pm
Hosted in Vancouver with AMS/zoom to all campuses
Instructor: Dr. Gretchen Rollwagen-Bollens
This graduate course is focused on the biology and ecology of aquatic microbes, including protists (“plant-like” algae and “animal-like” protozoans), bacterial communities and viruses in aquatic systems. The course will consist of instructor-led presentations/lectures and student-led discussions of primary research literature, with consultation and support from the instructor. Each student will be expected to lead at least two discussions (with a student partner), to prepare two short literature reviews, and write an 8-10 page review paper.
Discussion topics may include:
• Aquatic protist evolution and paleoecology
• A review of microbial biodiversity and function
• Ecological physiology of planktonic microbes
• Worldwide abundance and distribution of aquatic microbes
• Challenges in sampling and identifying aquatic microbes
• Role of microbes in aquatic food webs
• Protist symbioses
• Protists, marine snow and carbon flux
• Role of viruses in aquatic systems
The seminar is open to advanced undergraduates who have taken BIO 106, BIO 372 and have approval of the instructor.

Biol 540- Stable Isotope Theory and Methods

Lecture: Tu, Th 9:10 – 10:25 Lab: TU 1:25 – 4:15
Students will learn to design, interpret, and critically evaluate the use of stable isotopic tools. Specifically, we will focus on efficiently learning terminology and notation, sources of variation,
mathematical models of isotope composition, and key applications of stable isotope techniques. The laboratory section of the course will provide handson experience with stable isotope mass spectrometers WSU Stable Isotope Core Facility to train you to run your own samples.
For information contact Dr. R. Dave Evans (5-7466; rdevans@wsu.edu)

506 Theory and Measurement of Turbulent Fluxes

Class hours: MON/WED 3:10-2:25pm meetings: Sloan 32 Instructor: Heping Liu
This course seeks to train graduate students in the theory and measurements of heat, water vapor, and carbon dioxide fluxes between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. Students will be introduced to the micrometeorological theory of atmospheric turbulence and land-surface fluxes and the working principles of state-of-the-art eddy covariance systems and sensors for flux measurements. Through detailed, hands-on practice, students will learn how to design and build a micrometeorological flux tower and gain skills in datalogger programming, sensor wiring, data acquisition, and post-field processing and statistical analysis of eddy covariance flux data. Quality assurance and quality controls of flux data will also be discussed. Special topics will be covered, including the surface energy balance over different ecosystems, terrestrial ecosystem carbon budgets, uncertainties in flux measurements, and fluxes over complex terrain. Students will learn how to utilize flux data from the FLUXNET or Ameriflux networks to study the surface energy budget, evaporation, and/or carbon budget over a variety of terrestrial ecosystems across different time scales.